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Herbology (most chinese, western, and rainforest herbs available:custom formulas created for each patient.) Everyone has a unique set of conditions going in to the makeup of their physical and emotional health; With correct diagnosis, utilizing combinations of the thousands of available medicinal plants, a vastly improved state of being is probable and usually achieved rapidly. PATENT MEDICINE from China is available, and nearly ANY single herb that you can name. Call or write for FREE consultations or information

MEDICINAL USES IN CHINA FOR AMBER Succinum is classified in China as being sweet in taste (though, in fact, it has barely any taste, being only slightly bitter and sweet; it has no fragrance), and neutral in nature. It is useless in decoction because so little material is extracted in boiling water (there is some extraction into alcoholic media). Mainly, Chinese amber is ground to powder and swallowed down with water or, more commonly, with a decoction of herbs that make up a formula with the succinum. It is also combined into pills made with powder or extract of the other ingredients. Typical dosing for succinum is 1.5-3.0 grams for one day. Because the powder is very fine, to avoid getting it stuck in the throat or inhaled, it is common to stir the powder into the warm decoction and swallow it down; being soaked in the liquid, the powder won't cause any problems. In the Materia Medica (5), succinum is listed among the "settling" or "heavy" sedatives, which are mainly mineral materials; in fact, amber is organic and quite light weight. There is an ancient saying in China that "when the tiger dies, its soul enters the earth and transforms into stone," referring to the droplets of amber. So the material is called tiger's soul: hupo (the po is the bodily soul; there are also spirit souls, called hun, that can roam about, but the po goes into the ground). Another sedative used by the Chinese is called fu-shen (spirit of poria), which is a segment of pine root with a solid fungus, poria (also called hoelen), that grows on it. In terms of sedative effects, fu-shen and amber are attributed similar properties. The properties of amber are also shared with other, chemically unrelated, fossil materials such as dragon bone and dragon teeth (mainly fossilized remains of mastodons and other large animals from the ice age period; they are mainly composed of calcium carbonate and other mineral components). The calming effect of succinum is only one of the claimed properties, which include these main areas: 1.Subduing fright, tranquilizing the mind, and relieving convulsion. Succinum is used in the treatment of palpitation, amnesia, dreaminess, insomnia, epilepsy, etc. According to Jiao Shude (6), it is mainly used to treat epilepsy; this is typically first diagnosed during childhood, so amber is used in pediatric formulas. According to the traditional Chinese viewpoint (which differs markedly from the modern medical interpretation in this regard), epilepsy is caused by children becoming frightened when they see a strange sight or hear a strange sound. An example of a Chinese treatment for epilepsy in babies and young children is the ancient Hupo Zhenjing Wan (Amber Fright-Settling Pill), a formula of 25 ingredients (7), including minerals (pearl, cinnabar, realgar; the latter two are based on heavy metals), animal parts from endangered species (rhino horn, musk), as well as ordinary herbs (mentha, angelica, uncaria, etc.). A smaller version of this formula is called Hupo San (Amber Powder), with 14 ingredients, but including the cinnabar and musk, as well as other substances of concern; several of its ingredients must be swallowed as powder, the others made into tea. A more suitable formula incorporating amber for modern use is Hupo Duomei Wan (Amber Sleep-improving Pill), made with just five ingredients: amber, codonopsis, hoelen, licorice, and antelope horn (an endangered animal species, that can be substituted by their domestic water buffalo horn); this formula is not indicated for epilepsy, however. 2.Alleviating water retention and relieving stranguria (difficult urination). Succinum is applied to the urinary disorders such as stranguria complicated by hematuria (blood in the urine), particularly when caused by pathogenic heat. Succinum is considered to be like hoelen, with which it is often combined, in promoting urination through its bland nature. A formula for kidney and bladder stones, with blood in the urine, is called Hupo San (Amber Powder; different than the formula by the same name mentioned above), with amber, plantago seed, juncus, and mentha (the three herbs are made as tea, which is then used to swallow down the amber powder). A modern formula, produced in Taiwan (Kaiser Pharmaceuticals) and sold worldwide, is Hupo Huashi Pian (Amber Stone-Transforming Tablets), which is used for kidney and bladder stones with blood in the urine; the formula includes imperata and san-chi (notoginseng; also called tien-chi ginseng) for stopping or preventing bleeding, and diuretic herbs for promoting the passage of stones. Some of the ingredients of the tablet, such as desmodium, lygodium spore, and orthosiphon, are reputed to shrink stones. In a Chinese clinical report (8), a formula called Paishi Decoction was given to 215 patients with renal, urethra, or bladder stones every four hours, resulting in elimination of stones in nearly 60% of the patients. The formula included amber, dianthus, plantago seed, gardenia, lysimachia, gallus (jineijin), rehmannia, achyranthes, lygodium spore, phellodendron, akebia, and licorice. A similar formula (9), called Rongshi Decoction (replacing dianthus, rehmannia, and phellodendron with malva, talc, bamboo leaf, and rhubarb), was given twice daily to 32 patients with stones in the urinary system. This method required an average treatment time of 45 days, but it was claimed that 30 patients had passed their stones. A third formula of similar nature (10), called Hupo Shiwei Decoction, using pyrrosia, talc, lysimachia, and lygodium spore as the main diuretic herbs, and with several blood vitalizing herbs (e.g., red peony, sparganium, zedoaria, and vaccaria) to accompany the amber, was given three times daily to 51 patients having urolithiasis. It was reported that 35 were cured, and that stones were found in the urine of many of the patients, the largest stone passed was 1.6 x 0.8 cm. In the Chinese clinical work, patients were told to drink plenty of water and also to do jumping exercises to try and help move the stones down. 3.Promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis. Succinum is used in the treatment of amenorrhea and abdominal mass caused by blood stasis and stagnation of vital energy. Amber is also recommended for lower abdominal pains affecting the genitalia, such as pain of the testes, prostate, uterus, or vulvar region. Amber is included in the 28-ingredient formula Da Tiaojing Wan (Major Menstruation-Regulating Pill) for irregular and painful menstruation (7). A clinical report (11) described a formula for benign prostate swelling, called Bushen Sanjie Decoction, derived from the traditional Rehmannia Eight Formula with addition of tonic herbs, such as codonopsis, astragalus, and asparagus, and blood vitalizing herbs, including amber, pangolin scale, eupolyphaga. It was claimed that following treatment for 6-12 months, 25 of the 30 patients so treated showed some improvement. Recently, amber has been included in some formulas for treatment of heart disease, because of its claimed blood vitalizing effects; for example, it was combined with ginseng and notoginseng in the treatment of angina (12). Yang Yifan (13) also mentions the use for heart disease, saying: "In clinical practice, it is used for patients with heart diseases when the blood is not circulating properly, and at the same time the patient has palpitations and restlessness, such as seen in coronary heart disease." The same formula with amber, ginseng, and notoginseng has been prescribed in cases of chronic liver disease to normalize the blood conditions (14). Jiao Shude (6) mentions that amber "frees the orifices" which is designation for treating conditions such as atherosclerotic blockage of the arteries and blood clots that can cause angina, heart attack, and stroke. 4.Other internal uses: Amber is used as an ingredient in tonic formulas, often along with pearl powder. A qi and blood tonic formula for lowering blood lipids-Jianyanling-is comprised mainly of amber, astragalus, pearl, rehmannia, ho-shou-wu, polygonatum root, and American ginseng; in addition to lowering lipids, it is used as an anti-aging formulation and a treatment to aid recovery for cancer patients after undergoing standard medical therapies (15, 16). Succinum is used in treating stomach ache, also in formulas with pearl. An example is the formula designated Weibao; the basic formula is comprised of pearl and amber with alisma, indigo (qingdai), mume, bletilla, licorice, san-chi, and rhubarb. To this, various additions would be made according to the presenting signs. In the study report of 100 patients treated with the Weibao formulas for chronic gastritis, about 80% of patients were said to show significant improvement of symptoms when using the herbs for 3-6 months (17). 5.Topical applications: Astringing ulcers and promoting tissue regeneration. Used externally, it is efficacious in the treatment of ulcers, boils, swellings, etc. Since this fossil resin has ingredients in common with those of the original resin, a look at other Chinese pine materials that contain the resin may shed light on the actions of amber. Aside from fu-shen (mentioned previously), there are two of them still used today (5): Colophonium (pine resin; rosin; originally called songzhi = pine teeth, and now called songxiang = pine fragrance) is said to be sweet and warm, and having the properties of drying dampness and dispelling wind and wind-damp (e.g., treats rheumatism). It is mainly used topically. Pine Nodes (songjie = pine node) is described as bitter and warm, having the properties of dispelling wind, drying dampness, and strengthening tendons and muscles. It is often used for "rheumatism." Further, if one examines other resins, such as "dragon's blood" (xuejie), used in Chinese medicine, they are typically recommended for vitalizing blood and alleviating pain, and applied topically to heal wounds.

LATIN NAME

CHINESE NAME

ACANTHOPANAX WU CHIA PI
ACHRYRANTHES NIU HIS
ACONITUM FU TZU
AGASTACHE HOU SHIANG
AKEBIA MU TUNG
ALISMA TSE HSIEH
AMOMUM SHA JEN
ANEMARRHENA CHIH MU
ANGELICA SINENSIS TANG KUEI
ANGELICA TUHO TU HO
ANGELICA DAHURAE PAI CHIH
ARCTIUM NIU PANG TZU
ARECA PIN LANG TZU
ARMENIACA (SWEET APRICOT) HSING JEN
ARTEMISIA (MUGWORT) AI YEH
ARTEMISIA CAPILLARIS YIN CHEN
ASARUM HSI HSIN
ASPARAGUS TEN MEN TUNG
ASTRAGALUS HUANG CHI
ATRACTYODES PAI CHU
AURANTUS CHIH SHIH
BIOTA PO TZU JEN
BUPLERUM CHIA HU
CARTHAMUS HUNG HUA
CHRYSANTHEM CHUEH MIN TZU
CIMICIFUGA SHENG MA
CINNAMOMUM KUEI PI
CITRUS (MANADARIN ORANGE) CHEN PI
CNIDIUM CHUAN CHIUNG
COICIS SEED I YI JEN
COPTIS HUANG LIEN
CORYDALIS YEN HU SO
CURCUMA YU CHIN
CUSCUTA TU SZU TZU
CYPERUS SHIANG FU
DEER HORN (SLICED ANTLER) LU JUNG
DEPURATUM MANG HSIAO
DIOSCOREA SHAN YAO
DRACONIS (DRAGON BONE) LUNG KU
EPHEDRA MA HUANG
ERIOBOTRYA PI PA YEH
EUCOMMIA TU CHUNG
EURALES CHIEN SHIH
EVODIA WU SHU YU
FORSYTHIA LIEN CHIAO
FRICTILLARIA PEI MU
GARDENIA CHIH TZU
GASTRODIA TIEN MA
GENTIANA LUNG TAN
GINKO SEED PAI KUO==Ginkgo biloba from Ethnobotanical Leaflets What's Related >> History, usage and botanical information on Ginkgo -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ginkgo biloba The oldest known living fossil, more than 5,000 years old is native to China. Ginkgo, maidenhair tree, has an average life span of 1,000 years. The oldest trees are serving in the temples of the Chinese's and Japanese Buddhist monks. These trees are considered to be very sacred to their way of life. One of the traditions is the leaves and fruits have been used as a herbal medicine for over a thousand years. The female tree's fruit is a delicacy in food preparation also. Another reason for their stature in civilization is their ability to withstand many outside influences of nature. A tree in Hiroshima survived the atomic bomb of World War II in 1945 on the 6th of August. A 1 km distance from the center of explosion, it was the first to bud in September of the same year. The tree is now known as the "bearer of hope" for the people of Hiroshima. The temple was built around this mighty tree. The front stairs are divided in half to surround and protect the tree. "Engraved on it "No more Hiroshima" and people's prayers for peace." (1) Also in Japan, a shimenawa (cord of rice straw) is tied around the trunk of the tree to keep off evil spirits, showing how sacred these trees are to their civilization. Ginkgoaceae is dated back to the Paleozoic era. That is over 200 million years ago. The highest diversity of gymnosperms took place during the Cretaceous. The ginkgo was at one point found in numerous places in the world. Fossil records show a decline in the trees around the Tertiary. This is thought to be because of the extinction of dinosaurs, which were the main distributors of the seeds. The first mention in Chinese herbal medicine was during the Ming dynasty in 1436. Ginkgo is recorded as being introduced to the U.S. in 1784. It is considered to be the sole living link between the ferns and conifers. However two species, Ginkgoites and Baiera, of the genera ginkgo are extinct. Ginkgo biloba is the only living species. Although, one of the species thought extinct was found in Vantage, Washington near the Columbia River Gorge. The ginkgo beckii, after George Beck, lives in the Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park. Structure Ginkgo can grow to be 20 to 30 meters in height and 9 meters wide with a trunk size up to 4 meters. The branches are long and short with regular, lateral branching and irregular when older. It is sparsely branched, and upright. "Branching appears to be controlled by the distribution of auxin, a naturally occurring plant hormone."(2) The trunk is grooved and on older plants has a corky texture. It prefers full to partial sun with moist, deep, sandy soil, but can adapt very well to about any given situation. It is also said to be resistant to disease, insect pest, fungus, fire, and air pollution. Growth rate is consider medium, yet provides excellent shade. Leaves are deciduous, falling either in 1 to 2 hours or in a few days. The color may vary depending on the type of ginkgo. Each individual leaf is fan shaped, bilobed, and dichotomously veined blade. They are about 3`` long with a pediole also the same length. The pedioles alternate along the terminal stem. However there are to leaves per pediole. The veins are slightly raised to give a ribbed appearance, also reducing the waterloss from evaporation. "Ginkgo also produces peg-like structures (chi-chi = nipples, sort of "aerial" lignotubers) along the trunk and branches that can grow into the ground and form roots as well as leafy branches above because of the embedded vegetative bud." (1) This has been connected to traumatic events, environmental stress and individual properties of a tree. Ginkgo is dioecious, meaning the male and female reproductive structures are produced on separate trees. These structures are restricted to the spur branches. The fruits of the female tree are an oval tan-orange. The size range from 2.3-2.7x 1.9-2.3 cm with an apical scar. Seeds will mature in a single season. Fruits from the female tree have a foul smell and can cause a mess when they fall in September and October. The female tree does not reach maturity until after 20 years of growth. The male pollen grains are carried by the wind to the female. This tree is preferred because there is no foul smell or mess on the ground. However in China the female tree is preferred there because the fruits are roasted. Reproduction A complete reproductive cycle from the pollination to the production of seeds will take approximately 14 months. In the first year, pollination and the gametophytic phase occur but the embryo does not develop until the following spring of the next year. The strobilus, which produces the pollen, is a loose, pendulous, catkinlike structure with a main axis. To this is attached numerous appendages, each bearing tow microsporangia at its tip. In the cells of the microsporangia is the place were meiosis occurs producing numerous haploid microspores. Cell division takes place in the microspores, giving rise to a five-celled pollen grain. Arising on the axils of bud scales and foliage leaves of the spur branch are the ovuliferous structures. A spur branch may contain either 2 to 3 erect ovules. The ovule contains a seed coat, integument, surrounding the nucleus. Meiosis occurs in the mucellus of the ovule. This gives rise to four haploid megaspore cells. In this stage of development, pollen is released from the microsporangis of the male tree. Wind carries the pollen to its destination, the micropyle at the tip of the integument. The pollen grain is then retracted into the pollen chamber of the nucellus. Multi-branched pollen tubes are then developed. A single megaspore in the ovule from meiosis will enlarge and undergo free nuclear divisions. No wall will form in this phase of the cycle, only after about 8,000 haploid nuclei are produced will a wall be synthesized. After it has become cellular, the archegonia will move towards the micropylar end of the ovule. Each ovule only contains one egg. At the basal end, the male gametophyte becomes suspended in a cavity above the fertilization chamber. The male gametophyte divides to produce two multiflagellated sperm. Contents of the pollen tube and sperm are released into the fertilization chamber. Approximately 1,000 sperms are released to swim to the archegonium were only one will fuse with the egg's nucleus. "Ginkgo and cycads are the only seed-producing plants that have motile sperm." (2) The major part of the growth cycle takes place after the fall of the seed to the ground. A mature seed consists of dictyledonous embryo, nutritive tissue of the gametophyte, and a seed coat. The butyric acid, which decays the outer covering, emits a foul smell often described as rancid butter. Medicine Ginkgo has many claims of being a healer or enhancer of the human body. Its healing properties have been used since ancient times in Chinese herbal remedies. In traditional medicine, the fruit is considered more important than the leaves. Seeds are used to stop asthma, enuresis, and leucorrhea. Studies have shown that ginkgoic acid and ginnol inhibit certain bacteria and fungal infections. However, taken in large doses, it can become fatal or lead to skin disorders or mucous membrane irritation. Today the standard extract amounts are 24% flavonoids and 6% terpenes. Out of the research it appears that basically there are three important effects of the extract on the human body: it improves blood flow to most tissues and organs, it protects against oxidative cell damage from free radicals, and blocks many of the effects of PAF (platelet-activating factor) that have been related to the development of a number of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and CNS (central nervous system) disorders." (1) Ginkgo biloba has also been tested for aid in Alzheimer's disease. The extract for this is taken from the leaves instead of the fruits. EGb 761 is the chemical used on this disease. It has improved memory, mood, and daily living skills. "Four double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (including one landmark U.S. study) have shown that 120-240 mg of the GBE extract EGb 761 improves quality of life in persons with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia." (3) The antioxidant activity in the brain and central nervous system may help prevent age-related decline in these areas of the body. Side effects have been shown to be devoid of anything serious. Another study done for Alzheimer shown ginkgo to boost the brains energy metabolism of glucose and increase electrical activity. "More than 34 human studies on ginkgo have been published since 1975, showing among other things, that ginkgo can increases the body's production of the universal energy molecule adenosine triphosphate, commonly called ATP."(5) A primary protective effect of the ginkgolides is their ability to inhibit platelet-activating factor (PAF). Cells release PAF, but too much of this can cause clumping of the platelets. High amounts of this can cause damage to nerve cells, poor blood flow to the CNS, inflammatory conditions, and bronchial constriction. Ginkgolides and bilobalide protect the nerve cells from damage during periods of low oxygen to the tissue. PAF is involved in various inflammatory, cardiovascular, and respiratory disorderss. The ginkgolides have an anti-PAF action, helping to modulate various enzyme systems and ion pumps. This helps to explain the broad-spectrum of biological activity.(6) Ginkgo is widely used for medication, but there is no government monitoring of the manufacture product as a dietary supplement. "Nearly one quarter of the thirty brands tested did not have the expected levels of chemical marker compounds for GBE." (4) From the products tested, all had lower levels than was claimed on the label. Also potential interaction with other nutrients or drugs, particularly coumadin or aspirin, can produce some unwanted side effects such as nervousness, headache, and stomachache. Usage Ginkgo biloba has many uses to our world. It is used for medical purposes, environmental, and personal piece of mind. This wonderful tree can be grown in many different ways, for example, bonsai, shrub, naturally, and dwarf. One of the largest ginkgo plantations in the world is located in Sumter, South Carolina. Outside China, Virginia contains the largest ginkgo grove, holding 340 trees, planted in the early 1930's, both male and female trees. For being a living fossil, how could we not appreciate this amazing species? The foul smell has caused most cities to use the male ginkgo trees along the sidewalks rather than the female. This is nice but to keep a species around for the next century, more female trees need to be planted. Think of it this way, you could have your own medicine shop in the back yard, or you could use the leaves for tea, or even roast the seeds to fit a perfect meal from a different culture than ours. Here is a recipe for you to try: Sweet "clear soup" (Sugar Water) Ingredients: 1/4 cup of longan pulp, 1/4 cup of red jujubes, 1/4 cup of lotus seeds, 1/4 cup of ginkgo fruits, 1/4 cup of lily petals, 1/4 -1 cup of rock sugar and 8 cups of water. Procedure: Wash longan pulp and red jujubes clean. Soak in water for 2 hours. Wash lotus seeds if they are fresh, dried ones, soak for 2 hours and wash. Shell ginkgo seeds and rinse. If dried lily petals are used, soak overnight. Fresh ones, peel off the membrane skin. Put all ingredients in a pot, bring to a boil, then simmer over a small flame for about an hour. Can be served hot or cold.
GINSENG JEN SHENG
GLYCYRRHIZA (LICORICE) KAN TSAO
GLYCYRRHIZA (HONEY CURED) KAN TSAO
GYPSUM SHIH KAO
LINDERA WU YAO
LONICERA CHIN YIN HUA
LOTUS SEED LIEN TZU
LYCIUM FRUIT KOU CHI TZU
MAGNOLIA BARK HOU PU
MAGNOLIA FLOWER HSIN I
MENTHA (PEPPERMINT) PO HO
MORUS SANG PAI PI
MOUTAN MU TAN PI
OPHIOPOGON MAI MEN TUNG
OYSTER SHELL MU LI
PAEONIA WHITE PAI SHAO
PERILLA LEAVES TZU SU YEH
PERSICA SEED TAO JEN
PEUCEDANUM CHIEN HU
PHELLODENDRON HUANG PO
PINELLIA PAN HSIA
PLACTYCODES CHIE KENG
POLYGALA YUAN CHIH
POLYGONUM HO SHOU WU
POLYPORUS CHU LING
PORIA COCOS (HOLEN) FU LING
PUERARIA ROOT KO KEN
REHMANNIA (COOKED) TI HUANG
RHUBARB TA HUANG
SAUSSURIA MU SHIANG
SCHIZANDRA WU WEI TZU
SCHIZONEPETA CHIH CHEIH
SCUTELLARIA HUANG CHIN
SILER FANG FENG
SOPHORA KU TSAN
STEPHANIA FANG CHI
TERMINALIA HO TZU
TRICHOSANTHES FRUIT KUA LOU KEN
TRICHOSANTHES SEED KUA LOU JEN
UNCARIA KOU TENG
ZINGIBER (DRIED) KAN CHIANG
ZIZYPHUS FT TA TSAO
ZIZYPHUS SEED SUAN TSAO JEN
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