East-West Center
Acupuncture & Herbology

Oriental Health Therapy

Seminars - Classes

Phone:(319)936-1255


Herbology (all chinese, western, and rainforest herbs available:custom formulas created for each patient.) Everyone has a unique set of conditions going in to the makeup of their physical and emotional health; With correct diagnosis, utilizing combinations of the thousands of available medicinal plants, a vastly improved state of being is probable and usually achieved rapidly. PATENT MEDICINE from China is available, and nearly ANY single herb that you can name. Call or write for FREE consultations or information

LATIN NAME

CHINESE NAME

ACANTHOPANAX WU CHIA PI
ACHRYRANTHES NIU HIS
ACONITUM FU TZU
AGASTACHE HOU SHIANG
AKEBIA MU TUNG
ALISMA TSE HSIEH
AMOMUM SHA JEN
ANEMARRHENA CHIH MU
ANGELICA SINENSIS TANG KUEI
ANGELICA TUHO TU HO
ANGELICA DAHURAE PAI CHIH
ARCTIUM NIU PANG TZU
ARECA PIN LANG TZU
ARMENIACA (SWEET APRICOT) HSING JEN
ARTEMISIA (MUGWORT) AI YEH
ARTEMISIA CAPILLARIS YIN CHEN
ASARUM HSI HSIN
ASPARAGUS TEN MEN TUNG
ASTRAGALUS HUANG CHI
ATRACTYODES PAI CHU
AURANTUS CHIH SHIH
BIOTA PO TZU JEN
BUPLERUM CHIA HU
CARTHAMUS HUNG HUA
CHRYSANTHEM CHUEH MIN TZU
CIMICIFUGA SHENG MA
CINNAMOMUM KUEI PI
CITRUS (MANADARIN ORANGE) CHEN PI
CNIDIUM CHUAN CHIUNG
COICIS SEED I YI JEN
COPTIS HUANG LIEN
CORYDALIS YEN HU SO
CURCUMA YU CHIN
CUSCUTA TU SZU TZU
CYPERUS SHIANG FU
DEER HORN (SLICED ANTLER) LU JUNG
DEPURATUM MANG HSIAO
DIOSCOREA SHAN YAO
DRACONIS (DRAGON BONE) LUNG KU
EPHEDRA MA HUANG
ERIOBOTRYA PI PA YEH
EUCOMMIA TU CHUNG
EURALES CHIEN SHIH
EVODIA WU SHU YU
FORSYTHIA LIEN CHIAO
FRICTILLARIA PEI MU
GARDENIA CHIH TZU
GASTRODIA TIEN MA
GENTIANA LUNG TAN
GINKO SEED PAI KUO
GINSENG JEN SHENG
GLYCYRRHIZA (LICORICE) KAN TSAO
GLYCYRRHIZA (HONEY CURED) KAN TSAO
GYPSUM SHIH KAO
LINDERA WU YAO
LONICERA CHIN YIN HUA
LOTUS SEED LIEN TZU
LYCIUM FRUIT KOU CHI TZU
MAGNOLIA BARK HOU PU
MAGNOLIA FLOWER HSIN I
MENTHA (PEPPERMINT) PO HO
MORUS SANG PAI PI
MOUTAN MU TAN PI
OPHIOPOGON MAI MEN TUNG
OYSTER SHELL MU LI
PAEONIA WHITE PAI SHAO
PERILLA LEAVES TZU SU YEH
PERSICA SEED TAO JEN
PEUCEDANUM CHIEN HU
PHELLODENDRON HUANG PO
PINELLIA PAN HSIA
PLACTYCODES CHIE KENG
POLYGALA YUAN CHIH
POLYGONUM HO SHOU WU
POLYPORUS CHU LING
PORIA COCOS (HOLEN) FU LING
PUERARIA ROOT KO KEN
REHMANNIA (COOKED) TI HUANG
RHUBARB TA HUANG
SAUSSURIA MU SHIANG
SCHIZANDRA WU WEI TZU
SCHIZONEPETA CHIH CHEIH
SCUTELLARIA HUANG CHIN
SILER FANG FENG
SOPHORA KU TSAN
STEPHANIA FANG CHI
TERMINALIA HO TZU
TRICHOSANTHES FRUIT KUA LOU KEN
TRICHOSANTHES SEED KUA LOU JEN
UNCARIA KOU TENG
ZINGIBER (DRIED) KAN CHIANG
ZIZYPHUS FT TA TSAO
ZIZYPHUS SEED SUAN TSAO JEN
MEDICINAL USES IN CHINA FOR AMBER Succinum is classified in China as being sweet in taste (though, in fact, it has barely any taste, being only slightly bitter and sweet; it has no fragrance), and neutral in nature. It is useless in decoction because so little material is extracted in boiling water (there is some extraction into alcoholic media). Mainly, Chinese amber is ground to powder and swallowed down with water or, more commonly, with a decoction of herbs that make up a formula with the succinum. It is also combined into pills made with powder or extract of the other ingredients. Typical dosing for succinum is 1.5-3.0 grams for one day. Because the powder is very fine, to avoid getting it stuck in the throat or inhaled, it is common to stir the powder into the warm decoction and swallow it down; being soaked in the liquid, the powder won't cause any problems. In the Materia Medica (5), succinum is listed among the "settling" or "heavy" sedatives, which are mainly mineral materials; in fact, amber is organic and quite light weight. There is an ancient saying in China that "when the tiger dies, its soul enters the earth and transforms into stone," referring to the droplets of amber. So the material is called tiger's soul: hupo (the po is the bodily soul; there are also spirit souls, called hun, that can roam about, but the po goes into the ground). Another sedative used by the Chinese is called fu-shen (spirit of poria), which is a segment of pine root with a solid fungus, poria (also called hoelen), that grows on it. In terms of sedative effects, fu-shen and amber are attributed similar properties. The properties of amber are also shared with other, chemically unrelated, fossil materials such as dragon bone and dragon teeth (mainly fossilized remains of mastodons and other large animals from the ice age period; they are mainly composed of calcium carbonate and other mineral components). The calming effect of succinum is only one of the claimed properties, which include these main areas: 1.Subduing fright, tranquilizing the mind, and relieving convulsion. Succinum is used in the treatment of palpitation, amnesia, dreaminess, insomnia, epilepsy, etc. According to Jiao Shude (6), it is mainly used to treat epilepsy; this is typically first diagnosed during childhood, so amber is used in pediatric formulas. According to the traditional Chinese viewpoint (which differs markedly from the modern medical interpretation in this regard), epilepsy is caused by children becoming frightened when they see a strange sight or hear a strange sound. An example of a Chinese treatment for epilepsy in babies and young children is the ancient Hupo Zhenjing Wan (Amber Fright-Settling Pill), a formula of 25 ingredients (7), including minerals (pearl, cinnabar, realgar; the latter two are based on heavy metals), animal parts from endangered species (rhino horn, musk), as well as ordinary herbs (mentha, angelica, uncaria, etc.). A smaller version of this formula is called Hupo San (Amber Powder), with 14 ingredients, but including the cinnabar and musk, as well as other substances of concern; several of its ingredients must be swallowed as powder, the others made into tea. A more suitable formula incorporating amber for modern use is Hupo Duomei Wan (Amber Sleep-improving Pill), made with just five ingredients: amber, codonopsis, hoelen, licorice, and antelope horn (an endangered animal species, that can be substituted by their domestic water buffalo horn); this formula is not indicated for epilepsy, however. 2.Alleviating water retention and relieving stranguria (difficult urination). Succinum is applied to the urinary disorders such as stranguria complicated by hematuria (blood in the urine), particularly when caused by pathogenic heat. Succinum is considered to be like hoelen, with which it is often combined, in promoting urination through its bland nature. A formula for kidney and bladder stones, with blood in the urine, is called Hupo San (Amber Powder; different than the formula by the same name mentioned above), with amber, plantago seed, juncus, and mentha (the three herbs are made as tea, which is then used to swallow down the amber powder). A modern formula, produced in Taiwan (Kaiser Pharmaceuticals) and sold worldwide, is Hupo Huashi Pian (Amber Stone-Transforming Tablets), which is used for kidney and bladder stones with blood in the urine; the formula includes imperata and san-chi (notoginseng; also called tien-chi ginseng) for stopping or preventing bleeding, and diuretic herbs for promoting the passage of stones. Some of the ingredients of the tablet, such as desmodium, lygodium spore, and orthosiphon, are reputed to shrink stones. In a Chinese clinical report (8), a formula called Paishi Decoction was given to 215 patients with renal, urethra, or bladder stones every four hours, resulting in elimination of stones in nearly 60% of the patients. The formula included amber, dianthus, plantago seed, gardenia, lysimachia, gallus (jineijin), rehmannia, achyranthes, lygodium spore, phellodendron, akebia, and licorice. A similar formula (9), called Rongshi Decoction (replacing dianthus, rehmannia, and phellodendron with malva, talc, bamboo leaf, and rhubarb), was given twice daily to 32 patients with stones in the urinary system. This method required an average treatment time of 45 days, but it was claimed that 30 patients had passed their stones. A third formula of similar nature (10), called Hupo Shiwei Decoction, using pyrrosia, talc, lysimachia, and lygodium spore as the main diuretic herbs, and with several blood vitalizing herbs (e.g., red peony, sparganium, zedoaria, and vaccaria) to accompany the amber, was given three times daily to 51 patients having urolithiasis. It was reported that 35 were cured, and that stones were found in the urine of many of the patients, the largest stone passed was 1.6 x 0.8 cm. In the Chinese clinical work, patients were told to drink plenty of water and also to do jumping exercises to try and help move the stones down. 3.Promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis. Succinum is used in the treatment of amenorrhea and abdominal mass caused by blood stasis and stagnation of vital energy. Amber is also recommended for lower abdominal pains affecting the genitalia, such as pain of the testes, prostate, uterus, or vulvar region. Amber is included in the 28-ingredient formula Da Tiaojing Wan (Major Menstruation-Regulating Pill) for irregular and painful menstruation (7). A clinical report (11) described a formula for benign prostate swelling, called Bushen Sanjie Decoction, derived from the traditional Rehmannia Eight Formula with addition of tonic herbs, such as codonopsis, astragalus, and asparagus, and blood vitalizing herbs, including amber, pangolin scale, eupolyphaga. It was claimed that following treatment for 6-12 months, 25 of the 30 patients so treated showed some improvement. Recently, amber has been included in some formulas for treatment of heart disease, because of its claimed blood vitalizing effects; for example, it was combined with ginseng and notoginseng in the treatment of angina (12). Yang Yifan (13) also mentions the use for heart disease, saying: "In clinical practice, it is used for patients with heart diseases when the blood is not circulating properly, and at the same time the patient has palpitations and restlessness, such as seen in coronary heart disease." The same formula with amber, ginseng, and notoginseng has been prescribed in cases of chronic liver disease to normalize the blood conditions (14). Jiao Shude (6) mentions that amber "frees the orifices" which is designation for treating conditions such as atherosclerotic blockage of the arteries and blood clots that can cause angina, heart attack, and stroke. 4.Other internal uses: Amber is used as an ingredient in tonic formulas, often along with pearl powder. A qi and blood tonic formula for lowering blood lipids-Jianyanling-is comprised mainly of amber, astragalus, pearl, rehmannia, ho-shou-wu, polygonatum root, and American ginseng; in addition to lowering lipids, it is used as an anti-aging formulation and a treatment to aid recovery for cancer patients after undergoing standard medical therapies (15, 16). Succinum is used in treating stomach ache, also in formulas with pearl. An example is the formula designated Weibao; the basic formula is comprised of pearl and amber with alisma, indigo (qingdai), mume, bletilla, licorice, san-chi, and rhubarb. To this, various additions would be made according to the presenting signs. In the study report of 100 patients treated with the Weibao formulas for chronic gastritis, about 80% of patients were said to show significant improvement of symptoms when using the herbs for 3-6 months (17). 5.Topical applications: Astringing ulcers and promoting tissue regeneration. Used externally, it is efficacious in the treatment of ulcers, boils, swellings, etc. Since this fossil resin has ingredients in common with those of the original resin, a look at other Chinese pine materials that contain the resin may shed light on the actions of amber. Aside from fu-shen (mentioned previously), there are two of them still used today (5): Colophonium (pine resin; rosin; originally called songzhi = pine teeth, and now called songxiang = pine fragrance) is said to be sweet and warm, and having the properties of drying dampness and dispelling wind and wind-damp (e.g., treats rheumatism). It is mainly used topically. Pine Nodes (songjie = pine node) is described as bitter and warm, having the properties of dispelling wind, drying dampness, and strengthening tendons and muscles. It is often used for "rheumatism." Further, if one examines other resins, such as "dragon's blood" (xuejie), used in Chinese medicine, they are typically recommended for vitalizing blood and alleviating pain, and applied topically to heal wounds. *********************************************************************************************
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